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Importance of Ties

The half-Windsor is derived from the Windsor in that it is only brought up around the loop on one side rather than both. It works well with light- and medium-weight fabrics

Half a Windsor knot:

To tie the half-Windsor, place the tie around your neck and cross the broad end of the tie in front of the narrow end. Fold the broad end behind the narrow end and bring it forward on the opposite side. The left and right sides of the narrow end, and the inside of the loop around your neck, form a triangle. Continue folding the tie over the sides of this triangle, rotating around the triangle in one direction. The sixth fold should bring the broad end up over the top of the knot from behind; push the end down through the loop in front of the knot between the fourth and fifth folds, work out any wrinkles, and pull the knot tight. If the tie is unbalanced, untie the knot and try again giving yourself more or less length to work with.

The Windsor knot:

To tie the Windsor, place the tie around your neck and cross the broad end of the tie in front of the narrow end. Then fold the broad end behind the narrow end and push it up through the inside of the loop around your neck. The left and right sides of the narrow end, and the inside of the loop, now form a triangle. The third and fourth folds should complete one rotation around the outside of the knot. The fifth fold brings the broad end over the top of the knot from the front to the back. The sixth and seventh folds again complete one rotation around the knot. The eighth fold should again bring the broad end up over the top of the knot from behind; push the end down through the loop in front of the knot that you made with the seventh fold, work out any wrinkles, and pull the knot tight. If the tie is unbalanced, untie the knot and try again giving yourself more or less length to work with.

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